The Point does lunch: The changing of the Southwest, as seen through the stomach

29 mars 2012

( mise à jour : 29 mars 2012 )

« It’s lunchtime in Pointe St-Charles. Just a few years ago that could only mean greasy pig’s knuckles, greasier Indian or greasiest patates from one of the neighbourhood casse-croûtes. But with condo construction and start-up tech companies come gourmet burritos, quinoa salads, cocktails and brunch—or so believe the owners of Café Cantina Taqueria. Welcome to the new Point.

 

[…]

 

Since social housing units are permanently taken out of the market, they won’t be directly affected by the Point’s revitalization or rent increases. “Some social housing units are allocated to low-income people whose rent is always geared to their income—25 or 30 per cent, which may or may not include heating,” says Damaris Rose, an urban geography and housing expert at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique. “In social housing that isn’t rent-geared-to-income, rent can go up, but there’s no profit motive, so they don’t go up as quickly as in the private sector.” But while social housing rent won’t be greatly affected, Rose says that “the inflation in house prices in the Point has now made it impossible for long-standing residents to even think about buying there themselves.” »

 

Lisez l’article complet sur le site du Montreal Mirror, jeudi 29 mars 2012.

 

The Point does lunch: The changing of the Southwest, as seen through the stomach

Montreal Mirror

Jeudi, 29 mars 2012

Journaliste : Amie Watson